Disbelief | Caroline in the Delta

What poetry means to Popcorn (12 year old from NYC)

National Poetry Slam 2nd place winner

12 year old poet

Terrified/Totalled/Trumped | Caroline in the Delta

theatlantic:

When Schools Literally Take Food Out of the Hands of Children

There are lots of tricky situations when it comes to educating children. But whether or not to take food out of a hungry child’s hands and throw it out should be one of the easiest calls for an administrator to make. And yet. Students lined up for lunchtime at Uintah Elementary School last Tuesday expecting to receive lunch just like any other day. But a school official had changed the rules: Now, if a student’s prepaid lunch account had insufficient funds, cafeteria workers were to take back the lunch, which costs about $2, and throw it out. So on Tuesday, when about 40 Uintah Elementary students tried to pay for their lunch at the end of the lunch line, cafeteria workers took their lunch and threw it into the trash. 
This Dickensian scene inspired near-universal condemnation. When the district posted an apology on its Facebook page, it attracted more than 8,000 comments. One wrote, “Shame on every one of you for this for the actions taken or for standing by and allowing this to happen. You should ALL be fired. I am ashamed of you.” Another commented, “This is so disgusting! Why would anyone do this to little children?” One mother, whose 11-year-old daughter had her lunch thrown out, told the Salt Lake Tribune the incident was “traumatic and humiliating.” Another Facebook post announcing the decision to put the cafeteria manager and her supervisor on paid leave got more than 1,500 comments. Many commenters called for the employees to be fired. One wrote, “Paid leave?? PAID LEAVE???? Paid leave is for vacations, on the job injuries, and expecting mothers! NOT for BULLIES who take lunch from children!!”
Read more. [Image: Steve Senne/AP Photo]


THIS IS TOTALLY INSANE

theatlantic:

When Schools Literally Take Food Out of the Hands of Children

There are lots of tricky situations when it comes to educating children. But whether or not to take food out of a hungry child’s hands and throw it out should be one of the easiest calls for an administrator to make. And yet. Students lined up for lunchtime at Uintah Elementary School last Tuesday expecting to receive lunch just like any other day. But a school official had changed the rules: Now, if a student’s prepaid lunch account had insufficient funds, cafeteria workers were to take back the lunch, which costs about $2, and throw it out. So on Tuesday, when about 40 Uintah Elementary students tried to pay for their lunch at the end of the lunch line, cafeteria workers took their lunch and threw it into the trash.

This Dickensian scene inspired near-universal condemnation. When the district posted an apology on its Facebook page, it attracted more than 8,000 comments. One wrote, “Shame on every one of you for this for the actions taken or for standing by and allowing this to happen. You should ALL be fired. I am ashamed of you.” Another commented, “This is so disgusting! Why would anyone do this to little children?” One mother, whose 11-year-old daughter had her lunch thrown out, told the Salt Lake Tribune the incident was “traumatic and humiliating.” Another Facebook post announcing the decision to put the cafeteria manager and her supervisor on paid leave got more than 1,500 comments. Many commenters called for the employees to be fired. One wrote, “Paid leave?? PAID LEAVE???? Paid leave is for vacations, on the job injuries, and expecting mothers! NOT for BULLIES who take lunch from children!!

Read more. [Image: Steve Senne/AP Photo]

THIS IS TOTALLY INSANE

Stopped. | Caroline in the Delta

Arkansas Winter | Caroline in the Delta

(Source: chiraa-khoor, via monsterface)

Home | Caroline in the Delta

theatlantic:

Why a 14-Year-Old Girl Decided to Sail Around the World Alone

In 2010, 14-year-old Laura Dekker took to the seas in her sailboat, Guppy, on a quest to become the youngest person to sail around the world alone. Maidentrip, a forthcoming feature-length documentary, follows Dekker on her voyage, told largely through footage that Dekker shot while at sea. Far from her family and without a support team, Dekker goes where the wind takes her. In an exclusive excerpt of the film above, Dekker sails from French Polynesia to Australia.

Read more.

WUT.

I am 800 years behind the universe, but this film is so worth seeing. Unique, genuinely well done, and leaves you feeling relatively satisfied with the universe, despite being 2 hours & 20 min long.

I am 800 years behind the universe, but this film is so worth seeing. Unique, genuinely well done, and leaves you feeling relatively satisfied with the universe, despite being 2 hours & 20 min long.

decryption:

imgur

Greatest.

decryption:

imgur

Greatest.