The Five Most [Unintentionally] Harmful Words We Say

marcusluther:

image

“I know how you feel.”

The simplest of phrases, one we all reflexively lean upon in our conversations. An earnest qualifier. Either a reaffirmation of an already-understood condition, or a revelation meant to establish a connection. A proclamation and an assertion.

Look, I know…

This is the biggest lesson I learned from Rachel Marx this summer. Glad Marcus puts it into a beautiful blog post. :)

(via monsterface)

Caroline in the Delta – The end comes slowly all at once.

brwnpaperbag:

Ghostly and mysterious ceramic figures by Sophie Woodrow.

OH MY GOD I WANT TO OWN THESE

(via sleep-experiments)

"

In my journal from that period, instead of writing how I felt, I sought out and copied everything that seemed to express what to me was inexpressible. From Proust, I took: “For henceforth you will always keep something broken about you.” From C. S. Lewis: “No one ever told me that grief felt so like fear. I am not afraid but the sensation is like being afraid. The same fluttering in the stomach, the same restlessness, the yawning. I keep on swallowing.” From Joan Didion: “A single person is missing for you, and the whole world is empty.” From O’Rourke: “Am I really she who has woken up again without a mother? Yes, I am.” From a short story by Alice Munro: “What he carried with him, all he carried with him, was a lack, something like a lack of air, of proper behavior in his lungs, a difficulty that he supposed would go on forever.” From one by David Long: “Eventually, a truck would come rattling down… a car door would chuff, and the world would go on—not where it had left off but on the other side of this nothing time. And when it did, though she couldn’t quite see it yet, [she] would begin the never-ending task of not forgetting her mother.”

Or this, from my mother’s favorite Hebrew poem, in which the poet, Natan Alterman, describes his beloved as “sudden forever.” Those two words, as well as the poem’s title—“A Meeting for Eternity”—are oxymorons that spell out the contradictions inherent in loss. What is the death of a loved one if not an oxymoron? My mother isn’t here, and yet I see her everywhere. I kept on looking for hints of her on the page, as though by retracing her beloved books and poems I would get to reclaim a part of her that was already slipping away.

"

The Unmothered

creativemornings:

Design is a process to solve challenges.
A powerful slide by Chris Glass from his May talk at CreativeMornings/Cincinnati.
Watch the talk.

creativemornings:

Design is a process to solve challenges.

A powerful slide by Chris Glass from his May talk at CreativeMornings/Cincinnati.

Watch the talk.

(Source: creativemornings, via good)

Plan the wedding, I am in love.

"That’s what I believe. I believe the universe wants to be noticed. I think the universe is improbably biased toward consciousness, that it rewards intelligence in part because the universe enjoys its elegance being observed. And who am I, living in the middle of history, to tell the universe that it—or my observation of it—is temporary?"

John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

Kick, Push, Kick, Push, Coast | Caroline in the Delta

Mah lyyyfe

Mah lyyyfe

supergeeked:

yung-maple:

deaupeassmango:

forevermore-me:

movsi:

tilthisweek:

jimmywill:

Forever reblog.

Speak.

True education is more powerful than any gun 

PREACH. THAT. GOSPEL. TRUTH.

THANK YOU!

You can feel the truth from this

That’s the plan

supergeeked:

yung-maple:

deaupeassmango:

forevermore-me:

movsi:

tilthisweek:

jimmywill:

Forever reblog.

Speak.

True education is more powerful than any gun 

PREACH. THAT. GOSPEL. TRUTH.

THANK YOU!

You can feel the truth from this

That’s the plan

(Source: lifeinthemargin, via sleep-experiments)

theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.
It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug.
Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.

It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug.

Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

THE DAY OF TESTING | Caroline in the Delta

With three more glorious days to go!

Books and Break | Caroline in the Delta

Starting Spring | Caroline in the Delta